Tuesday, March 22, 2016

Has Art become a Science?


 
A modern study has found that the intelligence of pop (popular hits) songs have been measurably reduced in intelligence over the past ten years.  This is a problem; however, this is not seen as a problem for capitalists that make millions of dollars selling garbage.  One of the major problems with Capitalism is homogenization for profits.  Soda is more profitable than juice or milk, so they encourage consumption of Pepsi or Coke products (and those two, very seldom is there an alternative like Sprecher soda) rather than something healthy and damn the consequences both health wise (physical and mental) and financial (externalities that can be measured).
Shows like Bar Rescue show that any business is more of a “science” than an “art.”  Creativity and individuality is reduced, and instead a formula is put into place to maximize profit.  The same is true with entertainment in today’s world.  Though the market place has grown increasingly diverse with the rise of Netflix and other outlets, and the ease of someone to make a movie when in the past it would take an entire film studio and a twenty-five year old could never afford a camera to shoot anything with, ultimately everything made (or at-least most things) are merely products that are calculated and studied by marketing groups extensively before being produced for mass consumption.  Art isn’t art anymore; that is to say, it isn’t about creativity, individuality or expressing a certain viewpoint.  It is about calculated formulaic consumption – even art is to some degree consumed by Capitalism and science which homogenize everything.
While art focuses on the individual’s mind and growing as an individual (normative claims), science is merely concerned with understanding and applying universal law (descriptive).  If things can be mass produced – all the better.  Science is innately concerned with the how and not the why or why not.  With meeting human needs and desires (and increasing profits in a Capitalist economy) and questioning the rightness or wrongness of the desires and whether or not people should be different, should strive for more, or not strive and be more ascetic – once again, something only art and philosophy properly understood are concerned with.
Thankfully, true artists with a genuine voice and active conscience still exist.  They are few and far between but this world hasn’t been entirely consumed by Capitalist mediocrity or soulless formulaic showmanship.

No comments:

Post a Comment